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Knitted blankets used to cover army tanks in Waiouru for Anzac Day

April 24, 2018

Pupils from Taupiri School show off their camouflage net. From back left: Waikato District Council placemaking team member Betty Connolly, Mayor Allan Sanson, former pupil Mackenzie Butler, placemaking team member Lianne van den Bemd. Pupils from left: Poutu Cheyne, Ny’Lee Cross, Gabe McNicol, Tayla Butler, Conner Smith-Hall, Florence Taylor, Blake Smith-Hall and Chelsie Smith-Hall.

Waikato kids have taken great joy in bombing some Army tanks.The fact they did it with yarn does not detract from the fun.Blankets knitted by children in the Waikato district have been turned into poppy-covered camouflage nets.

Council placemaking team members Betty Connolly, left, and Lianne van den Bemd with the Scorpion tank outside the National Army Museum at Waiouru.

 

The yarn nets were knitted by pupils at Te Uku School, Kimihia Primary School, Waingaro School, Taupiri School and Tuakau Primary School last year.
The project was organised by Waikato District Council. It was just one of the projects on the go around the region to commemorate Anzac Day 2018.
 

Knitted and crocheted poppies decorate the Perry Bridge.


On Thursday, the nets were taken down to the National Army Museum in Waiouru to decorate the Centurion and Scorpion tanks.

The children were taught how to knit while learning about the history of Anzac Day. They discovered that during World War I, families at home would knit garments for the troops overseas.

"This is the first time yarn-bombing has been allowed to happen near any of the Army equipment," said Lianne van den Bemd,​ of Waikato District Council's placemaking team.

 

Nearly 2000 poppies have been used along the northern stretch of the Te Awa cycleway at Ngāruawāhia.

 

"It's very exciting for the schools involved."

The camouflage nets will be draped over the Army tanks for the next few weeks, van den Bemd said.

"A lot of work has gone into it, so hopefully the schools can go down and have a look."

 

Anne Ramsay, left, and Venessa Rice from the Ngāruawāhia Community House decorate a tree in the district.

 

Waikato District Mayor Allan Sanson took the camouflage nets down to Waiouru with council's placemaking team.

"Our grandmothers knitted garments to help to keep our Anzac troops warm," Sanson said.

"We're bringing history into the present day by following the latest international trend to use yarn to create community-friendly street art.

 

Anzac silhouettes were created by council staff and prisoners at Spring Hill Corrections Facility.

 

"These art installations also represent the local, national and international bonds that we have been weaving in the century since we first sent our Anzac troops overseas."

National Army Museum senior curator Windsor Jones welcomed the contribution from the schools. 

"It's a great opportunity to use weapons of war and conflict to commemorate and remember those who have fallen in a novel and unique way," Jones said.

The poppies attached to the camouflage nets have been knitted and crocheted by people from both inside and outside the Waikato district.

In the poppy project, more than 8000 poppies were hand-made to decorate trees in every township in the district, as well as the northern stretch of the Te Awa Great River Ride cycleway at Ngāruawāhia and across the Perry Bridge.

A tree is blossoming with poppies out the front of the district council building and staff have created an Anzac art installation.

Prisoners at Spring Hill Corrections Facility helped council staff to create plywood art cutouts of a tank, a ship and a war plane, representing the troops who served and died. More of their cutouts to represent those who remained at home.

 

Central Waikato Anzac Day services 2018

 

Hamilton services

Dawn parade kicks off at 5.45am, leaving from Knox Street. The service begins at 6am at Memorial Park and the Civic Parade begins at 9.45am, leaving from Knox Street and proceeding down Anzac Parade to Memorial Park. There, the 10am civic service will take place.

 

Matamata Dawn Service

The dawn service will be held at the Matamata-Piako Civic and Memorial Centre, Tainui Street, at 6am. The parade will muster in the Farmers Carpark, Tainui Street, at 5.45am.

 

Matamata Civic Service

The civic service will be held at Matamata-Piako Civic and Memorial Centre, Tainui Street, at 9.30am. The parade will muster in the Farmers Carpark, Tainui Street, at 9.20am.

 

Walton Civic Service

The service will be held at the Walton Hall, Main Road at 11am.

 

Morrinsville Dawn Service

The service will be held at the Morrinsville RSA, 27 Studholme Street, at 6am. At 6.15am, there will be a three-round blank volley fire by the World Ware II Historical Reenactment Society.

 

Morrinsville Civic Service

The service will be held at the Cenotaph, Howie Park, at 10.30am. At 10.45am, there will be a three-round blank volley fire by the WWII Historical Reenactment Society. If it's raining, there will be no parade and the service will be held at Morrinsville Events Centre. Everyone involved in the parade is asked to meet at the events centre at 10am.

 

Te Aroha Dawn Service

The dawn parade will muster at the Te Aroha RSA, 67 Rewi Street, at 5.45am. The service begins at the war memorial at 6am. Breakfast will be served at the RSA at 6.30am.

 

Te Aroha Civic Service

The service will be held at the war memorial in Kenrick Street at 10.30am. If it is raining, there will be no parade and the service will be held at the RSA. Everyone involved in the parade is asked to meet at the RSA at 10am.


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